DES MOINES, Iowa — Testing positive for COVID-19 is stressful, and when you’re pregnant, you’re now worried for two.

For 15 weeks, WHO 13’s Jodi Long has had a healthy pregnancy. But what she thought were symptoms of being pregnant, turned out to be much more.

“You just can’t trust a sniffle these days. You can’t trust a cough,” Long said. “And I was like, I better take an at-home test.”

That test came back positive for Long, as well as her 2-year-old son Bishop.

“When the test came back positive, I was crushed. I was mad, I was sad, I was worried because we felt like we had done everything possible to protect ourselves but we still got sick,” Long said. 

“You already worry so much as a parent. You already worry extra when you are pregnant, and then to have this on your plate and you’re wondering, well how long is this going to last for and will it have any lingering effects?”

Long said she is vaccinated and boosted, which doctors say helps prevent serious infections.

Dr. Neil Mandsager specializes in maternal and fetal medicine at MercyOne Perinatal Center. He said short term, the baby could be benefitting.

“We know that any maternal antibodies that would be formed either in response to an infection or to the vaccine have potential to cross the placenta into the baby,” Dr. Mandsager explained.

Thankfully, Long’s symptoms are improving every day. She hopes sharing her story serves as an example to others that if you’re unsure of your symptoms to get tested.

“It’s worth getting tested whenever you have any symptoms because it might be COVID,” she said.

If you are pregnant and worried about COVID-19, talk with your doctor about ways you can protect you and your baby.