The Insiders Segment 1

DES MOINES, Iowa — Tax cuts are on the way for most Iowans. And depending on whether you agree or disagree with the idea of cutting taxes, they either mean taxpayers get to save nearly $2 billion a year when they are fully phased in or that state leaders will have to figure out how to do without nearly $2 billion a year for services for residents.

“We believe that it’s going to drive prosperity all across the state,” Governor Kim Reynolds said about the value that she sees in tax cuts.

The Insiders Segment 2

Public school educators get a $1,000 bonus if they agree to teach next year. Governor Reynolds is using federal COVID-19 relief aid to reward teachers after they’ve endured two grueling years of educating during this health and economic crisis. But why limit the bonuses to just teachers? Don’t paraeducators, cafeteria workers and bus drivers also deserve additional benefits in light of their service during trying times?

“I think most of ours (available federal money for education bonuses) is gone,” Governor Reynolds said.

The Insiders Segment 3

Build Back Better has not fared well. The Biden administration’s goal of a far-reaching economic package that promised improvements in health care, child care, senior care, education and climate change hasn’t made it through Congress, even though Democrats hold a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives and have a 50-50 split in the U.S. Senate (with Independents usually voting with Democrats plus Vice President Kamala Harris’ ability to cast a tie-breaking vote on legislation).

U.S. Representative Cindy Axne, a Third District Democrat from West Des Moines, believes it’s time for a new approach for her party leadership. “Problem is that we sometimes can’t get bills to go it alone,” she said of what could be the most simplistic approach by just taking one issue at a time.

Instead, she would like to see her party leaders craft a smaller, more focused legislative package.

The Insiders Segment 4

Is it time for Iowa to park a long-standing tradition and no longer display people’s county of residence of their license plates? It’s one of the questions that Governor Reynolds answers in this week’s Insiders Quick 6.